December - January Offshore Gulf Fishing Forecast
            By, Capt. Dave Pinkham
Cobia made a decent showing in December. And, although they are a migratory species, and generally move father south as the gulf's water temperature decline, there is still a good possibility depending on the weather of course, that there may be some cobia hanging around some of the offshore artificial reefs. When fishing these spots there are two methods you can use this time of the year, drift fishing and anchoring over the structure. If you do anchor down, attempt to get directly over the structure. This will put the odds in your favor for catching fish. When drift fishing, try fishing at different depths with live baits. Drifting these areas will work best on the days the winds are light. Gag grouper action is really picking up now that we've had a taste of winter. The same cold fronts that pushed the kingfish south of here will often push gag grouper closer to the coastline. To catch gag grouper I suggest with the aid of your fish finder, you locate some hard bottom such as a ledge, an area of coral, shipwreck, or one of the artificial reefs. Once again, try to get your boat anchored over or near the structure. Now, using live and or cut bait drop your rig to the bottom. It's that simple! A good stout rod with heavy line (50-pound test) should be used. Gags tend to hit hard, and then run for the nearest cover, so hang on tight and crank the handle! Mangrove snapper should help put dinner on the table on the days the gags don't want to cooperate. You'll find the snappers at the same bottom structures as the groupers inhabit. When targeting snappers use a lighter rod. I prefer to use a 20 to 30-pound rig. Snapper often will hit just about any natural bait when they are hungry. Although mangrove are the most commonly caught snapper for this area, with the cooler water temperatures look to catch others species such as muttons, yellow tails, lanes, and vermilions as well. Greater amberjack fishing should be good through the month. To catch the keepers, don’t stop running west until you hit 100-foot of water or deeper. These big bruisers will make a believer out of anyone that’s looking for a real battle. Amberjack can usually be found in areas around sunken structures such as wrecks, ledges, and springs. Live bait fish, and or rapidly retrieved jigs or lures will get them fired up and feeding. Remember if you're not out fishin you're wishin you were. Get out and go fishin cuz' it's good fer ya! Capt. Dave Pinkham has been on fishing guide on the Southwest coast of Florida for more than 20 years. CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE VENICE FLORIDA HOME PAGE
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December - January Offshore Gulf Fishing Forecast
            By, Capt. Dave Pinkham
Cobia made a decent showing in December. And, although they are a migratory species, and generally move father south as the gulf's water temperature decline, there is still a good possibility depending on the weather of course, that there may be some cobia hanging around some of the offshore artificial reefs. When fishing these spots there are two methods you can use this time of the year, drift fishing and anchoring over the structure. If you do anchor down, attempt to get directly over the structure. This will put the odds in your favor for catching fish. When drift fishing, try fishing at different depths with live baits. Drifting these areas will work best on the days the winds are light. Gag grouper action is really picking up now that we've had a taste of winter. The same cold fronts that pushed the kingfish south of here will often push gag grouper closer to the coastline. To catch gag grouper I suggest with the aid of your fish finder, you locate some hard bottom such as a ledge, an area of coral, shipwreck, or one of the artificial reefs. Once again, try to get your boat anchored over or near the structure. Now, using live and or cut bait drop your rig to the bottom. It's that simple! A good stout rod with heavy line (50-pound test) should be used. Gags tend to hit hard, and then run for the nearest cover, so hang on tight and crank the handle! Mangrove snapper should help put dinner on the table on the days the gags don't want to cooperate. You'll find the snappers at the same bottom structures as the groupers inhabit. When targeting snappers use a lighter rod. I prefer to use a 20 to 30-pound rig. Snapper often will hit just about any natural bait when they are hungry. Although mangrove are the most commonly caught snapper for this area, with the cooler water temperatures look to catch others species such as muttons, yellow tails, lanes, and vermilions as well. Greater amberjack fishing should be good through the month. To catch the keepers, don’t stop running west until you hit 100-foot of water or deeper. These big bruisers will make a believer out of anyone that’s looking for a real battle. Amberjack can usually be found in areas around sunken structures such as wrecks, ledges, and springs. Live bait fish, and or rapidly retrieved jigs or lures will get them fired up and feeding. Remember if you're not out fishin you're wishin you were. Get out and go fishin cuz' it's good fer ya! Capt. Dave Pinkham has been on fishing guide on the Southwest coast of Florida for more than 20 years. CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE VENICE FLORIDA HOME PAGE
this site is maintained and operated by: